Literary and Educational Writings, 1 and 2: Volume 1: Antibarbari / Parabolae. Volume 2: de Copia / de Ratione Studii, Volume 23-24

Literary and Educational Writings and Volume Antibarbari Parabolae Volume de Copia de Ratione Studii Volume These volumes are the first in a series containing works by Erasmus that concern literature and education interests which to him were scarcely separable The aim of Erasmian education was a civilized l
  • Title: Literary and Educational Writings, 1 and 2: Volume 1: Antibarbari / Parabolae. Volume 2: de Copia / de Ratione Studii, Volume 23-24
  • Author: Erasmus
  • ISBN: 9780802053954
  • Page: 295
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Literary and Educational Writings, 1 and 2: Volume 1: Antibarbari / Parabolae. Volume 2: de Copia / de Ratione Studii, Volume 23-24
    These volumes are the first in a series containing works by Erasmus that concern literature and education interests which to him were scarcely separable The aim of Erasmian education was a civilized life, expressed in Christian piety and the fulfilment of public and private duties and embellished by learning and literature Towards these ends the soundest training forThese volumes are the first in a series containing works by Erasmus that concern literature and education interests which to him were scarcely separable The aim of Erasmian education was a civilized life, expressed in Christian piety and the fulfilment of public and private duties and embellished by learning and literature Towards these ends the soundest training for youth was what Erasmus often called bonne litterae, good letters, a literary and rhetorical training based on Greek and Latin authors For centuries the classical curriculum was the core of liberal education, and Erasmus was long regarded as its exemplar Though never a university teacher except briefly at Cambridge 1311 14 , he was a teacher of teachers through his treatises on pedagogy and rhetoric and his many works of scholarship The four works presented here in annotated translations are characteristic expressions of his dedication to learning and his confidence in the values of classical literature for the modern world of his time Antibarbari 1520 , translated and annotated by Margaret Mann Phillips, is a defence of the humanities against ignorant and misguided critics who question both their supposed worth and the appropriateness of pagan writings for Christian pupils The reply of Erasmus becomes a manifesto on behalf of reason, scholarship, and literature As for paganism, he insists that if secular knowledge is used properly it cannot harm but must help Christians None of the liberal disciplines is Christian because they all antedated Christianity, yet they all concern Christ because they can be put to Christian uses Parabolae 1514 , translated and annotated by R.A.B Mynors, a work that contributes eminently to style, is a collection of similitudes drawn from observations of men, customs, and nature Many are culled from Plutarch and Seneca, but for those from Seneca, and from Aristotle, the moral applications are added by Erasmus As an exercise in the rhetoric of moral philosophy many jewels in one small box, Erasmus terms it this book quickly became popular and long remained so De copia 1512 , translated and annotated by Betty I Knott, is not a plan for the entire curriculum but a treatise on the abundant or rich style in writing and speaking Latin, a guide to attaining fluency and variety in discourse As a manual for students De copia broke new ground It was a remarkably successful work, used in schools in many lands for generations From 1312 to 1600, than 130 printings are recorded De ratione studii 1312 , translated and annotated by Brian McGregor, furnishes a concise but clear exposition of the curriculum, text, and methods of Erasmus programme for liberal studies in grammar schools Here as in all of his writings on education, language is the heart of the matter The main goals are accurate, effective expression and communication in Latin, though Erasmus expects much besides literature to be learned from the study of literature He emphasizes the necessity for competent and sympathetic teachers.Each translation is introduced by the translator, and a general introduction by the editor discusses the significance of each of the works, its relation to the others, and its subsequent fortunes Wallace K Ferguson provides an introductory essay, The Works of Erasmus.
    Literary and Educational Writings, 1 and 2: Volume 1: Antibarbari / Parabolae. Volume 2: de Copia / de Ratione Studii, Volume 23-24 By Erasmus,
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    About " Erasmus "

  • Erasmus

    Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus 28 October 1466 12 July 1536 , known as Erasmus of Rotterdam, or simply Erasmus, was a Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian.Erasmus was a classical scholar and wrote in a pure Latin style Among humanists he enjoyed the sobriquet Prince of the Humanists , and has been called the crowning glory of the Christian humanists Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament, which raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter Reformation He also wrote On Free Will, The Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.Erasmus lived against the backdrop of the growing European religious Reformation, but while he was critical of the abuses within the Catholic Church and called for reform, he kept his distance from Luther and Melanchthon and continued to recognise the authority of the pope, emphasizing a middle way with a deep respect for traditional faith, piety and grace, rejecting Luther s emphasis on faith alone Erasmus remained a member of the Roman Catholic Church all his life, remaining committed to reforming the Church and its clerics abuses from within He also held to the Catholic doctrine of free will, which some Reformers rejected in favor of the doctrine of predestination His middle road approach disappointed and even angered scholars in both camps.Erasmus died suddenly in Basel in 1536 while preparing to return to Brabant, and was buried in the Basel Minster, the former cathedral of the city A bronze statue of him was erected in his city of birth in 1622, replacing an earlier work in stone.

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