At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things

At the Bottom of the Garden A Dark History of Fairies Hobgoblins Nymphs and Other Troublesome Things At the Bottom of the Garden is a history of fairies from the ancient world to the present Steeped in folklore and fantasy it is a rich and diverse account of the part that fairies and fairy stories h
  • Title: At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things
  • Author: Diane Purkiss
  • ISBN: 9780814766835
  • Page: 112
  • Format: Hardcover
  • At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things
    At the Bottom of the Garden is a history of fairies from the ancient world to the present Steeped in folklore and fantasy, it is a rich and diverse account of the part that fairies and fairy stories have played in culture and society.The pretty pastel world of gauzy winged things who grant wishes and make dreams come true as brought to you by Disney s fairies flitting acrAt the Bottom of the Garden is a history of fairies from the ancient world to the present Steeped in folklore and fantasy, it is a rich and diverse account of the part that fairies and fairy stories have played in culture and society.The pretty pastel world of gauzy winged things who grant wishes and make dreams come true as brought to you by Disney s fairies flitting across a woodland glade, or Tinkerbell s magic wand is predated by a darker, denser world of gorgons, goblins, and gellos the ancient antecedents of Shakespeare s mischievous Puck or J.M Barrie s Peter Pan For, as Diane Purkiss explains in this engrossing history, ancient fairies were born of fear fear of the dark, of death, and of other great rites of passage, birth and sex To understand the importance of these early fairies to pre industrial peoples, we need to recover that sense of dread.This book begins with the earliest manifestations of fairies in ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean The child killing demons and nymphs of these cultures are the joint ancestors of the medieval fairies of northern Europe, when fairy figures provided a bridge between the secular and the sacred Fairies abducted babies and virgins, spirited away young men who were seduced by fairy queens and remained suspended in liminal states.Tamed by Shakespeare s view of the spirit world, Victorian fairies fluttered across the theater stage and the pages of children s books to reappear a century later as detergent trade marks and alien abductors In learning about these often strange and mysterious creatures, we learn something about ourselves our fears and our desires.
    At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things By Diane Purkiss,
    • [KINDLE] Ö At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things | By ☆ Diane Purkiss
      112 Diane Purkiss
    • thumbnail Title: [KINDLE] Ö At the Bottom of the Garden: A Dark History of Fairies, Hobgoblins, Nymphs, and Other Troublesome Things | By ☆ Diane Purkiss
      Posted by:Diane Purkiss
      Published :2020-03-22T02:11:31+00:00

    About " Diane Purkiss "

  • Diane Purkiss

    Purkiss also writes children s books with her son, Michael Dowling, under the pseudonym Tobias Druitt.

  • 683 Comments

  • Purportedly a history of fairy tales, this book serves neither as a history nor a particularly good resource about legends I had to give up on this after this passage, In later stories, Peter Pan is joined by boys who have fallen out of their perambulators, their suspiciously womblike perambulators is this a mere bowlderization of miscarriage miscarriage or stillbirth What WHAT I started skimming after that It s not a very well organized book, and Purkiss s logic is all over the place Her conclu [...]


  • this is snipped from the comment I sent to the author Tad Williams about this book on Facebook I had asked if he d read it, he said he did not I asked if he wanted to know what I thought about it and he said sure here is what follows I m first going to say that I am glad I held my reserve Unfortunately while a lot of what she aims for is some really good and new thinking, she doesn t go as deep into the evidence for her theories as I d like She is a lazy scholar and will ramble on about referenc [...]


  • I have to admit I only got half way through this I found it very disappointing It felt like as a history it was all over the place She seemed to have no real structure or thesis behind her arguments, what she was choosing as her sources seemed odd and in the end gave a very odd and distorted view There was totally no sense of change over time in this book, rather she seemed to be doing almost the opposite, looking for things that were the same and saying becuase they were the same they must be t [...]


  • My favorite book on fairies Not for those who want to see happy cuty little beings A re read for notes Love this book What are fairies really, but the dead, the ancestor, the nameless thing we all fear in the dark The Other.I absolutely adore this book It changed my life That s a great book.


  • Having spent several years of my life entrenched in academia, I feel a great joy when I find an intelligent, in depth book that is beautifully readable This book is so easy to read that a non specialist can not only understand it, but be interested in it It was a pleasure to read and I look forward to re reading it.


  • The perception exists with some who attend my storytelling workshops that fairies are always tiny, female and mostly nice I doubt that many storytellers would hold to this view We have all heard and sometimes tell stories of baby stealing and other nasty activities of the fairy folk.Diane Purkiss goes further with her study of fairy lore and literature She sees the roots of fairies in some of the horrific characters of Greek and Roman myths They didn t call them fairies in those days but Purkiss [...]


  • Despite publicity material that describes it as a rich and diverse account of the part that fairies and fairy stories have played in culture and society and the Introduction by the author that gave the impression that she quite enjoys fairies, fairy stories and folklore, throughout the book there is no real sense of Purkiss connection with her subject matter She stretches the boundaries of what constitutes a fairy to include all kinds of beings from ancient mythology and yet is also reductionist [...]


  • It starts out well but after a while her insistence on applying Freudian and feminist literary criticism even where it doesn t seem appropriate is tiresome She can be witty, but halfway through the book her wit begins to sound bitter and snarky And strange as it may seem to say, the book seems mean Originally I ended this with I may not finish it, but that turned into I didn t finish it The amount of Freudian literary criticism mounted to an intolerable level, and as the book progressed witty tu [...]


  • I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and would recommend it to anyone with an interest in Fairy or Fairy history The Victorian and Edwardian chapters held my attentions the most, whereas I got bogged down a bit with the Shakespearean period as it was a tad heavy for me but then I m not a scholar or intellectual enough to read it with ease but saying that, I took my time and came through it knowing the book would be incomplete without it The chapters on the ancient and medieval history were ver [...]


  • I just wanted to post a small correction to the book The model for Tinkerbell was not Marilyn Monroe but Margaret Kelly Though Diane Purkiss isn t wrong about Tinkerbell being based on a sex symbol Miss Kelly had been voted Best Legs In Hollywood at the time she modeled for Tink and voiced one of the mermaids.




  • She s straightforwardly right about Peter Pan IMO I appreciate that.Not sure I buy her theory about the origin of Celtic fairies in Mesopotamia, Greece etc It reminds me of the argument I learned from fundamentalists, that all flood myths around the world must all stem from the Great Flood Uneven but worthwhile if you re at all interested in folklore Also suggested for any fantasy genre fan as a solid grounding in mythos helps in appreciating and understanding complex material.


  • I ve read quite a bit of this in Katharine Brigg s books, but enjoyed revisiting the Fair Folks in this one, too Folks who want to learn about the Gentry need to read this So many different creatures, so interesting to learn about them


  • An interesting, if highly problematic look at the cultural history of fairies There is definitely here about the role of fairies in popular culture than about the folklore, legends and mythology that inform the modern image of the fairy tale Some of this is interesting, such as the sordid truth behind Victorian fairy plays , in which young girls, usually from a working class background, were dressed as beautiful winged creatures on stage but were exploited and treated badly off it Much of it is [...]


  • I won t lie I didn t finish this I was somewhat disappointed in it I did love and appreciate all of the research that went into it and I enjoyed reading about the different myths and folklore that the author researched The witch trials were fascinating I just really could have done without the Freudian readings and the psychology It just wasn t what I was looking for ultimately I wanted info on the stories, not a psychological reading of why people needed or created them The author seems to be g [...]


  • A volume I picked up on whim whilst grazing through the local used bookshops, this was the first scholarly work on folklore I ever read Purkiss s research into fairy lore, running the gamut from its ancient origins through Early Modern treatises and witch trial depositions to contemporary incarnations, is delivered with a loving skepticism and trademark snark an approach I found instantly charming.Though Purkiss s frequent reiteration that fairies are the dead could, I suppose, grow tiresome for [...]


  • This one took me a while to read, mostly because it s scholarly then I usually read for fun and I just wasn t taking enough time in a sitting to really get into it Also, I don t usually read a lot of history.Considering all that, I enjoyed this book and found it informative The author was very good about not using jargon and explaining things There were a couple of times where she referred to a different work or source with the sense of, of course everyone s heard of this, but she didn t do tha [...]


  • Purkiss book is a very good and easily accessible look at how society views fairies and other little folk She starts, mostly, in the Middle Ages and works her way up to the present day, including a quick look at how fan fiction uses fairy folk She also mixes in history, dealing with Scottish witch trials among other historical events.


  • I agree with other reviewers that this is all over the place and feels disorganized I also agree that the introduction is the most interesting part I was surprised at the lack of evidence for most of her assertions in a scholarly book they seem speculations presented as fact So many Interesting parts and ideas, but ultimately I felt unconvinced.


  • I d hardly call this a work of research but I must admit there were some interesting connections made particularly in reference to Lilith and feminism or witches and hallucinogenic drugs on broom stick handles.


  • Really great research and interesting insights the random personal opinion style comments that popped up every so often were strange and distracting though.







  • I didn t appreciate all the digs at Disney movies, but aside from that, this was pretty good Kind of dry at times, but it was a good overview of things.


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